Programme D, The One Festival @ The Space

12th January – 27th January

The One Festival – Programme D

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The final programme of the One Festival, Programme D, offers a slightly different structure than the others I’ve attended. Rather than featuring four or five shows of around twenty to thirty minutes each, it consists of an hour-long piece before the interval, and four shorter pieces after. This format allows us to really dive into the first piece, and then enjoy the pieces that follow as a sort of collage of short experiences. As I have come to expect from this year’s One Festival, I found the pieces that make up Programme D to be remarkably, consistently fine, despite a few places that could use some more polish. Programme D provides an intimate, compassionate look at people; their thoughts, their feelings, their sensual experiences, and their deepest, most comical embarrassments.

 

Mission Abort, Written and Performed by Therese Ramstedt, Directed by Claire Stone

Mission Abort exemplifies this intimacy, as it explores the deepest doubts and emotions of a woman before, after, and during an abortion. Therese Ramstedt does a wonderful job of making the piece feel close to us, speaking to the audience as if speaking to her closest confidante, and frequently making use of members of the audience to bring parts of her story to life. Ramstedt’s writing is filled with charming, self-effacing humour, and her performance shows real, deeply-felt emotion masked by a youthful affectation of not-being-bothered. The piece explores the experience of having an abortion, and the experience of anticipating and recovering from one, in deep and intricate detail. It was enlightening for me, and I expect will be to many cis-gendered male viewers, to learn just how frustrating and confusing that the experience can be, even in a country where the procedure is relatively available and accessible. As enlightening and entertaining as it was, I was aware while viewing it that the piece might still need some refinement. Structurally, the piece seems to end halfway through and begin again, which is slightly disorienting as an audience member and distracts from the very strong material in the second half. Despite this issue, I felt the piece is very much worth seeing. It’s a piece that is heavily laden with engrossing, revealing, and entertaining material, even if it feels like that material needs to be re-organized in order to truly shine. That material is complemented by stirring directing by Claire Stone, who creates such a striking image at the climax of the piece that I was sure it must be the finale. Filled with dark humour and disarming honesty, Mission Abort is an entertaining and illuminating journey into what it’s like to be young woman faced with an unwanted pregnancy in England today.

 

Crossrail by Philippa Mannion, Performed by Karen Ascoe, Directed by Jodie Botha

Crossrail is instantly refreshing, simply for telling a story from a point of view that is all-too-seldom shown in our arts and media. This beautiful character study by Philippa Mannion centres on Anne, a 56 year old Engineer working on the the new Elizabeth Line project. Again, simply by telling a story of an successful, independent, career-focused woman in her 50’s working in a STEM field, Crossrail is already interesting, but it’s made more interesting by the fact that it’s artfully written and sensitively, skilfully performed. Philippa Mannion’s script tells the story of a woman coming to terms with the loss of her husband by living her life to the fullest without him; moving from fascinating project to fascinating project, tending to her growing family tree, and eventually feeling comfortable enough to explore romance with others along the way. She expertly draws us a character who is profoundly intelligent, but also powerfully kind; a woman who is admirable in her ingenuity and strength, but always, always human. Enhancing and refining that humanity is Karen Ascoe, who brings a great sensitivity and life to the role. Ascoe beautifully captures the soul of a woman who is bursting with energy and joie de vivre. She imbues Anne with a deep passion. The way her eyes light up when she’s telling us about something she loves, whether that be her daughter’s baby shower or the tunnel breaking through at Farringdon Station, is a joy to behold. Artfully constructed and beautifully executed, Crossrail is an entrancing character study of a woman who is blazing through life with passion, intelligence, and independence.

 

 

 

Just One More Time by Guleraana Mir, Performed by Minhee Yeo, Directed by Mingyu Lin

This sensual and sensitive vignette by Guleraana Mir subverts expectations, as it tells the story of Suri and her disappointment with her new dance partner. This compassionate short play, performed with strength and elegance by Minhee Yeo, explores the trust we put in our partners, be they in dance or in life. Mir packs the short and engaging piece with sensual imagery and tender feeling, and Minhee Yeo’s sensitive performance is artfully showcased by Mingyu Lin’s directing. Altogether, the effect is intoxicating, and we are given an engrossing look into the life of a character who lives through movement and connection.

 

A Fallen Cigarette Butt Written and Performed by Stefanie-May Hammoudeh

A Fallen Cigarette Butt is a challenging piece to review, as its effects are difficult to describe. Structurally, the piece is a series of vignettes seen around a public square, told from the point of view of writer/performer Stefanie-May Hammoudeh as she reflects on a discarded cigarette. But Hammoudeh’s language, full of rhythmic repetition and lyrical, swirling descriptions, provides a feeling of reality twisting and turning around . Indeed, the entire experience feels meditative and dreamlike. Hammoudeh’s poetry doesn’t have any clearly spelled out message. Rather, it seems designed more to create a zen-like state, leaving one with an awareness of the connections between things. This poetic meditation on the mind-boggling richness of the world around us is beautifully written and performed by its creator. Through its lyricism and poetry, it shifts our awareness of the world around us in a subtle yet profound way.

 

The End of Term Show by Olu Alakija, Performed by Anthony Covens, Directed by John Fricker

 

The most clear-cut comedy of the evening, The End of Term Show is a hilarious, cutting show about childhood embarassment. It follows Maxwell Martin as he describes, in moment-to-moment detail, the day he became “The Boy Who Killed Christmas.” Olu Alakija’s piece is packed with clever, irreverent jokes, and Maxwell is played with manic verve by Anthony Covens, who almost berates the audience with the story of how he was unjustly maligned for ruining a school nativity play in his childhood. Full of energetic humour and performed with panache, The End of Term Show is a festive treat for the gloomy January season.

 

As I’ve found with the other sections of the One Festival, Programme D is an exciting evening of theatre, filled with intriguing characters, fascinating writing, and great performances. It features a collection of beautifully drawn characters telling intimate, personal stories. Well constructed and thrillingly executed, the work on display in Programme D is a stirring and well crafted collection of new writing.

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