The Sound and the Fury, RCSSD @ The Pleasance

21 Feb – 24 Feb, 2018

by William Faulkner
Directed by Sasha Milavic Davies

Review by guest contributor Niamh Blackman


The opening of the Sound and the Fury at Pleasance Theatre set the mood. Benny (Rhys Anderson) paints a lilting Mississippi-accented picture of the breezy hot plantations of 1900’s Mississippi. The actors walked on one by one, already creating an energy with which the entire play would buzz right to the end. 

We follow through the eyes of the three brothers of the Common family, as we watch them teeter and then fall down the brink of decay. From the off, it was clear that this was a creative team that had found a goldmine of current references; the struggle of race was clear, as was the struggle for power between men and women. It’s very much a story of our times. Unfortunately, I was invited to the closing night of the play – but I would heartily recommend that you read the book as well, so that you get the same messages I got.

The story of The Sound and the Fury is narrated by three different brothers: First Benjy, the simple brother, looked after by Dalsey, the housekeeper and her family, then Quentin, a Harvard student with the weight of his decaying family wealth and his love for his sister, finally by Jason, the embezzling, greedy oldest brother. The story jumps between time frames following the decline of the family through scandal after scandal. The cast brilliantly steer us through the narrative, so this is never jarring (although the first few times it was a little confusing!)

Rhys Anderson was a brilliant narrator – captivating, with great subtlety in creating his first character, Benjy, who is intellectually disabled. His complete transformation into Dalton Ames and then Herbert was so complete, that there was no doubt auto who he was playing at any one time. His sister and some-time carer Caddy was played by Emily Windham, who captured the 7 year old Caddy with delightful innocence that we hold onto throughout her ruination.

Marshall Nyanhete, who played Benjy’s carers Luster and Versh, gave a strong and solid performance which, alongside that of Angelina Chudi (playing his mother Frony), gave voice to the next generation of African American’s who wanted more than the life of a second-class citizen. They managed this with humour, asking many a person, including the heads of the family, for money to go to a music show.

Daniela Cristo Mantilla played the vivacious Miss Quentin with fire and verve, tormenting Jason, brought to life by Steve Salt. Salt brought a huge amount of energy to his characters, including a dynamic and animalistic portrayal of Jason, the embezzling brother. James Broadly created a great contrast to this in the calm and assured Quentin, played with a quiet strength. Grace Melhuish created a fantastic character in Mother, a southern belle far past her time. Her portrayal created a depth to the chaos of the family, helped along by the suburb performance from Dennis Sofian, who played Father. He also created some fantastic moments accompanying the action on his violin.

The stand out performances came from Luyanda Unati Lewis-Nyawo (playing Matriarchal housekeeper Dalsey), and Bolaji Alakija (who played Roskus and TP). Both performers gave mature and resonant performances. They brought the play’s most powerful, human moments – a simple tut, the bandaging of a husband’s hand, all creating the feeling that Faulkner wrote into the novel; that “they endured.”

I should comment that the staging and lighting was excellent. The warm haze of the Mississippi plantains could be felt from the beginning. As the family fell further and further into disrepute, the staging and lighting became more and more random and off-quilter, upsetting the view for us in the audience and creating a sense of unease and dread. The use of music was fantastic, if at some points superfluous, again, building the world for us to see.

This was a story that is upsettingly poignant for our times. The performance was slick and compelling. I just wish I’d been invited earlier in the run to encourage people to see it.

Instead, here is their Twitter: @ActingCDT. This is a group with huge talent. Follow them and go see them next time.


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