REVIEW! Twelfth Night @ The Rose Playhouse

Written by William Shakespeare
Directed by Adam Nichols
Musical direction by Tom Cagnoni
23rd April – 5th May 2019

This jukebox interpretation of one of Shakespeare’s awkward comedies is a fun romp, showcasing a widely talented cast.

Photography Credit – Lou Morris Photography

Set on a 1920’s cruise ship, the production runs to a tight 90 minutes, necessary as the semi-excavated historic Rose Playhouse has no heating or bathrooms. Behind the narrow shelf of the stage is a cavernous pit where the 400 year old structure is being revealed – in this production, the pit becomes the sea.

The 1920’s setting gives reason to the characters’ manias and hedonism – the war is over, and now we can drink, play pranks and fall in love. Duke Orsino (Will Forester playing him as frankly bi-curious) is our captain, Olivia (Emma Watson at full glamour) a famous actress. The innocent, plucky Viola (Lucy Crick) washes up on board and finds herself stuffing her trunks to convince people that she is worth employing – still a legitimate concern, even in the post-war relaxing of gender roles, women should not be alone with men.

The small staging space was cleverly used, the primary set piece being a modified piano that provided backing music as well as serving as a prop. The fourteen actors played music, sang and clowned, keeping the audience laughing and clapping along. Not all the songs felt entirely necessary – it’s not that they were poorly performed as much as they didn’t add much to our understanding of the characters. I don’t really need to hear the jazzy redux of the Thong Song in its entirety to know that Toby Belch is gross, or a cover of Alessia Cara’s Here to know that Feste feels out of place.

Photography Credit – Lou Morris Photography

There tends to be little to add to Shakespeare’s comedies, which play with gender and expectation in a cultural context we have no experience of. It’s common enough to cast Feste the fool as a girl, and Hannah Francis-Baker does a fine job as a grinning Greek chorus, using re-arranged pop songs to comment on the action of the play. This production, however, really leaned into the amorality of charismatic drunk Lady Toby (Anna Franklin as a washed up music hall star) and her crew, making a female Malvolia (Faith Turner playing priggish perfection) suffer – it’s more distressing to see a woman stripped to yellow stockings and taunted for thinking she might be loved than it is a man. In between that and the gentle, pitiably foolish Sir Andrew (James Douglas, at peak upper class twit), the play ends on a curious note, perhaps commenting on the torment of being the butt of jokes. It doesn’t entirely land – as it maybe can’t, without adding a post-script to Shakespeare’s play.

This production is worth your attention, appropriate for fans of pop, comedy and Shakespeare.

Tickets

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Previous Review: H.M.A.S. Pinafore @ The King’s Head Theatre

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