REVIEW! Naked People Waking Up @ Etcetera Theatre, Camden Fringe

Directed by Olugbeminiyi Bammodu
Devised by Concept Theatre
29th- 30th July 2019

Naked People Waking Up was a perfectly minimalist production, focusing on the text and the capable cast to take us through the very different lives of each character. Performed in the slick black box theatre at Etcetera Theatre, the performers’ ability to multi-role and find the truth in the text made the different scenes believable without needing extravagant set.

The relatable protagonists consisted of a middle aged impolite man with a comical demeanour, a woman focusing all her attention on the lack of attention she receives from her father, a young lad working in Wetherspoons despite his degree and intelligence, and an even younger school boy working on his confidence… and they wake up in an empty room together in there matching underwear  (I wasn’t 100% sure why they would all have the same underwear, but soon realised it was practical for the frequent multi-rolling and in keeping with the minimal style).

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The comical young school boy with a modern tongue and wise heart, played by Kyll Anthony Thomas Cole

The story was very clear from the start, although I felt the beginning section – where the characters woke up and met for the first time – was slightly rushed and could possibly be developed further. However the show progressed at a great pace, with the characters regularly being tossed into various flashbacks and interesting memories which allowed us to build our understanding of each storyline gradually. Too often we are spoon fed theatre, but Concept Theatre has created a strikingly fresh piece of work here.

There were many highlights to this show; the audience responded extremely well to the comical moments of the piece – jokes involving cheap Wetherspoons food etc – which gave the show a lighthearted atmosphere, only to bring us straight back in with emotional monologues of realisation. In particular, I was blown away by Cathy Parkin’s ability to bring text to life and draw us in with her emotion. All the cast were emotionally committed through the text, however I would love to see the physicality brought to life even more.

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A troubled young woman who comes to a deep realisation on what matters most. Played by Cathy Parkin

An honest performance highlighting the pressures we put on ourselves when we lose sight of what matters – in life, in love. Naked People Waking Up encourages the audience to reflect on ourselves and the choices we make. Overall, this was a well-rounded performance with a talented cast and brilliant director, a must see!

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Previous review: Mating in Captivity @ The King’s Head Theatre

REVIEW! A Winter’s Tale @ The Warren, Brighton Fringe

Director: Myles O’Gorman
Assistant Director: Sophie Leydon
Producer: Frances Livesey
NEXT SHOWING: The Warren, Brighton – Sunday 26th May – 6pm

A Winter’s Tale is not the first Shakespeare play we recall, although it is named among the best of his final plays, and in this adaptation by Helikon Theatre Company I can certainly see why. This tale of desperate jealously and shocking tragedy was cleverly adapted to fit our modern world, and with their talented cast and creative directing, it was a wonderful performance.

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Emma Blacklay-Piech (Mamillius) and Rhonwen Cash (Hermione)

With a simple, modern set complete with a projector and live streaming camera, O’Gorman created an outlook which was immediately familiar with the audience. The camera was mainly used to display the King Leontes, played by ALRA graduate Conor Kennedy, addressing his subjects (the audience) to update them on political and personal matters. The days passing were also projected as well as intimate moments in the garden between Hermione, played by Lindsey Huebner, and Polixenes, played by Lanre Danmola, which were obviously  prerecorded yet added another layer to this dynamic production. However, using so much technology within a Fringe performance can cause problems… my only fault with this piece would be the technical cues and accuracy.

The colloquial phrases interspersed with the original Shakespeare text added comical moments and also allowed the audience’s auto-translator (which we all have watching Shakespeare… don’t lie) to take a break. The main actor, Kennedy, truly grasped the comical timing of Shakespearean as well as the adapted moments of modern text. The energy and emotion he brought to the space was honest and powerful, his portrayal of Leontes’ distracted mind, stubborn outlook on his wife’s affair, and later heartbreak was all spot-on and heartfelt.

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Conor Kennedy (Leontes)

This emotionally charged piece found creative ways to display the more challenging moments of the script, for example the three deaths which drives the plot and gives depth to the characters and the text. (No spoilers here!)

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This radical portrayal of A Winter’s Tale was refreshing, dynamic and most of all well performed. I would certainly recommend a trip to Brighton to catch the last showing!

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Previous review: A Winter’s Tale @ The Warren, Brighton Fringe

REVIEW! The Agency @ The Old Red Lion Theatre, London Horror Festival

Written and Directed by Davey Seagle
Ponydog Productions / Old Red Lion Theatre
London Horror Festival
9th-11th October 2018

In Davey Seagle’s The Agency, nothing is quite as it seems.

As soon as you enter the theatre you become immersed in the dystopian future of 2029, where justice is privatised, and your actions as an audience determine how the show ends. Faced with various scenarios, you, as an audience, vote digitally via your phone on the play’s dilemmas, with each decision you make building towards the play’s climax. Votes are displayed via projection on the back wall, and, thankfully for an interactive show, audience members can participate as much or as little as they want. You can suggest solutions, vote, debate, sit quietly, or in the case of some of my fellow theatregoers, turn into bloodthirsty maniacs.

I left feeling transported, slightly shaken, and immensely entertained.

It’s a fast-paced and witty dark comedy, with a hard-hitting moral core, and it raises some fascinating ethical questions. If a murderer’s incarceration costs £50 000 a year (which it does), is it ethically better that money is rather spent on a dozen cancer treatments? If the murderer is in prison 20 years, that’s the equivalent of

£1mil of taxpayer money. So if you had the choice, would you rather than pay for 140 cancer treatments? Or give the money to the bereaved?

But if you don’t lock them up, what do you do with the murderer? And what for that matter do you do with the cancer patients?

The Agency lets the audience decide, and you might be surprised where your moral compass takes you. And due to the multiple branching choices within the plot, it’s hard to tell what was written and what’s improvised. It’s not a show likely to end the same way twice.

Glueing the together is its impressive cast. Niamh Blackman and Chris Elms in particular shine as Chuck and Cherry, your guides through the treacherous realms of satirical corporate bureaucracy (much funnier than it sounds). Their energy, quick thinking, and earnestness give the show its structure, humour, and much of its emotional impact. Georgie Oulton too provides a sympathetic and powerful twist as Bunny, while Davey Seagle occasionally chimes in hilariously as the obnoxious and multi-tasking lighting man.

Not to say that there weren’t problems. There were definitely hiccups in the show. A tech breakdown, laggy internet issues that were a plague to the pacing, the more improv-heavy sections occasionally being bogged down by rowdy audience members before adroit ship-righting by Elms and Blackman, and perhaps some ham-fisted writing during Bunny’s monologue scene. But overall it’s an extraordinary show, and I’d like to see what this team could accomplish on more than their shoe-string pub theatre budget.

Tickets

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